How to Find the Right Chin Rest for Your Violin

The violin chin rest help allows the left hand to move freely, especially during vibrato and movements. Many students are not aware that the chin rest provided with their equipment may not fit perfectly. This chin’s height, shape, and position should be carefully considered when choosing hand support, as no two people have the same physical build.

Height

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As a general rule, the longer the person’s neck, the more complicated the chin is required. According to Lynne Denig of chinrests.com, “there should be about one finger space between the top of the resting [chin] and the jaw when the eyes are looking forward. A chin that is too large puts a strain on the neck because the player cannot support the skull’s natural weight on the chin, which is essential for wonderful violin support. Also, a chin rest that is too low could cause the head to tilt and warn the player that he could lose his chin to reach the collarbone. The lower part of the violin should always be in contact with all these clavicles. You will find the chin rest on the market.

Shape

The chin type affects both the angle of the brain and the comfort of the jaw. Players with large, round and fleshy jaws prefer to have a wider and flatter chin rest that works with a reduction crest through the back. Players with a long, thin face will be much more comfortable with a reinforced shape and a steeper angle. A bad head angle is often the result of students hoping to inspect the bottom of the fingerboard.

It is important to remember that playing the violin is ultimately an auditory-tactile process in which the hands’ palms understand how to achieve perfect pitch through ear-controlled muscle memory. A crooked neck rest could also result from this player’s inability to achieve perfect alignment between the jawbones and the type of chin support. If we think of the chin part as part of the jaw just below the nose, the brain should contact the chin on the left side of the eyebrow (in other words, the left jaw).

Position

position

The chin rest can be placed on both sides (the plate next to it, with the feet next to or above the cord) or in the center (both the plate and the cord, together with the feet mounted around the cord). There are two factors to consider when choosing a position for the rest of the jaw. When the rest of the knee joint is around the side, the shoulder should extend slightly to form a large handshape on the fingerboard. Players who find it uncomfortable will benefit from a chin rest, which is placed in addition to the tail.

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